It’s Pumpkin Season!

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We can decorate them, consume them, and hey, even throw a party for them…

I’ll admit it. At  five  one point in my life, I got way too competitive in the pumpkin patch, and started running after a certain pumpkin(s), screaming “dibs!” and pointing, before another person could, with my arms flailing in the air. But let’s not talk about that. Let’s just pretend I didn’t just write that out for the public to know.

So, I’ve already gotten my bright orange, precisely symmetrical, I. can’t. wait. to. carve. a. scary. face. into. it. kind of pumpkin, but let’s talk about all of other versions out there. I mean, we’ve got so many options now, how’s a girl to choose? Between the sweet heather grey, to the cinderella-shaped, or even the dark green warty one that we all hate to love. We can decorate with them, consume them, and hey, even throw a party for them. Pumpkin season is thriving, so which will you choose? (Clearly, I chose them all… I hate love myself for it).

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Let’s get scientific.

Pumpkin. A winter squash, part of the Cucurbit family. The name pumpkin comes from the Greek word, ‘pepon,’ meaning large melon.

Health. Not only are these babies pretty to look at, but they are also delicious and nutritious to eat.

Comprised of 90% water

High in fiber, potassium, and beta-carotene

Pumpkin “meat” was used by Native Americans to moisturize skin

Rich in Vitamin A, C, E and B-6.

Pumpkin seeds provide magnesium, zinc (for immune support), and plant-based omega-3 fats.

Favorites. I have pumpkins outside on my porch, as well as in my kitchen. Here are a few of my must-haves.

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In The Kitchen:

Butternut Squash — I’ve been roasting these in the oven with organic olive oil and whole cloves of garlic. Top them off with Himalayan salt and cracked black pepper.

Spaghetti Squash — These suckers are perfect for pasta lovers like me. In an effort to avoid heavy carbs, I’ve been baking these in the oven. Just slice in half, scoop out the seeds, bake. Scrape the ‘noodle’ flesh out, and pour your favorite sauce on top.

Sugar Pumpkin — Perfect for pumpkin pie. Just load up on the cinnamon, babes.

Sweet Dumpling Squash — This whitish-yellow and green squash is small and perfect for an individual serving. The flesh tastes like a sweet potato!

Acorn Squash — I’ve been dicing this sucker up and tossing it in my kale salads.

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For The Decor:

Fairytale Pumpkin — The name fits perfectly, what with its dark green color that fades to mahogany. It has deep ribs and a smooth, hard surface. I always have at least two of these.

Galeux D’ Eysines — I adore this pumpkin. Everything about it. From the elegant name that I can’t even pronounce, to the salmon-peach colored skin covered in peanut, shell-like warts (which is caused by sugar in the skin). You have to get one of these this season.

Turks Turban — See that weird-shaped pumpkin that looks like two pumpkins are growing in one? Yeah. That’s this cool thing. I love the bright, vibrant contrast of colors, and how quirky the shape is. It’s always fun mixing these into a grouping.

Jarrahdale — This pumpkin is the real hero in the group. It’s creamy grey-blue in color keeps my decor more modern and grounded.

Rouge Vif d’Etampes — A heirloom, French pumpkin that can grow to weigh more than 30 pounds. This is the huge, orange, magical pumpkin of our dreams.

Farewell Advice.

When picking out your pumpkins, squashes, gourds, make sure to pay attention. Look for soft spots, mold, weird wrinkles, chips or cuts. Any of these things indicate damage to the pumpkin, and could result in early decaying. The pumpkin should have a hard stem, and the base should feel firm all over.

Ok! Enough is enough. Exit out of this window, and head to the pumpkin patch!

Follow FP Madisyn on Instagram + take a peek at her blog!

Comments

  1. I love these photos and words! I haven’t been to the pumpkin patch yet, but hoping to this weekend to celebrate Halloween.

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