wednes-diy

i’m sure some of you remember these adorable stockings we sold a few years back.  i’ve been kicking myself ever since for not buying one – so i finally decided to take matters into my own hands and make my own free people stocking inspired by the ones above!

i went over to a.c. moore during my lunch break in search of a stocking and embellishments.  they didn’t have the plain old red stockings i had in mind, but this knit one worked just as well. i also got some fake fur trim, ribbon, feathers, sequin trim, and some tassels and pom poms i didn’t end up using.

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the only items i used from here at the office were a free people bag (which many of you may have!) and some strips of fabric from our display team.

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the only other things you need for this project are scissors and fabric glue! your stocking might come out a little bit prettier if you sew things onto it but the glue worked just fine and was quicker :)

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i started out by gluing the fur trim to the top and then worked my way down by adding different embellishments at random. it only took a little over an hour, and here’s the end result!

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i’m really happy with it and it will look lovely hanging by my desk. now i want to make more!

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if any of you are inspired to make your own stockings i would love to see photos! you can send them to blog@freepeople.com :)

wednes-diy

some of you asked for a tutorial on how to make the sequin hangers in our holiday displays… well ask and you shall receive! one of our lovely visual display gals was kind enough to put this together for the blog. the hangers are actually quite easy to make!

a hanger, scissors, needle & thread, marker, pins and fabric! we obviously used sequin fabric, but any kind of fabric works and would look great. i’m already thinking about all the other fun fabrics i want to try :) and if you can’t find sequin fabric, try looking for a sequin top at thrift stores!

steps

steps (pictured above):
1. trace outline onto fabric 1/2” around outside edge of hanger – do this twice for front and back pieces.
2. cut out both pattern pieces on marker outline.
3. place the two patterns on top of each other, with insides of fabric facing out. pin together. sew tops together only, 1/4” in from edge of fabric, along pink dotted line.  if you are using sequin fabric, we suggest sewing by hand – the sequins might break your sewing machine needle!
4. turn cover right side out.
5. cut small hole in top center of hanger cover.  poke metal hanger through hole.
6. cover hanger with fabric.  sew bottom shut by hand.

all done!

wednes-diy

for today’s DIY i want to show you guys how to make snowflake panels like the ones in our new store displays! it’s actually really not as difficult as it looks, it just requires a lot of patience and good cutting skills :)

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image via design sponge.

these panels immediately reminded me of a DIY i saw a while ago on design sponge – the only difference being the material.  our team actually made ours out of paper first, and then had them laser cut out of felt.

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what you need: paper or felt or whatever material you want to use (this is a great way to re-use old scrap paper or junk mail!), scissors, and glue or tape!

start by making as many paper snowflakes as you desire, in varying sizes, patterns and shapes – because no two snowflakes are alike ;) if you’ve never made a paper snowflake before, check out this tutorial.

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once you have a bunch of snowflakes, start gluing them together where they overlap, alternating shapes and sizes as you please.

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i’m going to keep adding to mine over the next few weeks!

for best results, hang your panel in front of a window and enjoy the patterns the sun leaves on the floor :)

wednes-diy

if you’ve been on our website lately you may have noticed these really cute little hand drawn frames that our graphic designers did. i love how they look, and then today i saw this post on design sponge and i was inspired! these hand drawn frames are a cute and cheap alternative to the real thing.

what you need: scissors, a glue stick, a black pen, paper and cardboard or a thicker type of paper (i used a manila folder).

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i glued a piece of paper to the manila folder – this will be the frame – so it would be a little sturdier.  take another piece of paper and fold it in half, then fold in half again, as pictured on the right. this is what you’ll use to make the frame shape.

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the frame can be any shape you want – i wanted it to be round, so i used a paper plate and traced the edges onto the folded paper, about an inch or so apart.

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cut along the black lines and unfold the paper to reveal the frame shape.  tape it to the manila folder, or whatever you use, and cut around it so you’re left with your frame.

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now for the fun part! put on some music and start doodling.

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i used it to frame an image from our catalog and i think it looks really cute! i definitely want to experiment with this some more though – i think it would be really fun to do for christmas cards :)

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wednes-diy

i saw this on poppytalk today and i couldn’t resist sharing.  did any of you guys ever make “god’s eyes”? i never have but they’re so awesome looking and simple to make. just tie two sticks together and weave the yarn around them, starting at the center – to see a quick tutorial on exactly how to wrap the yarn, click here. plus you can play around with the colors to get some really pretty combinations – they’d make lovely little table decorations or even christmas tree ornaments!

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i also love the pieces of driftwood wrapped in yarn – it reminds me of this photo from our office that i posted not too long ago:

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wednes-diy

you may have noticed these lanterns hanging in our new university village store…they were made by one of our fp girls who works for our west coast display team, and she was kind enough to write up a little tutorial for the blog!

what you need: wire framed lantern, fabric scraps, trims, needle, straight pins, and thread.

lantern: the lantern we use is custom made in india. it is a simple wire frame with a mylar cylinder in the middle for good light diffusion (these lanterns are more about style than a good light source :)). with this raw form, fabric is attached.

i suggest going to a thrift store and looking for lamp shades with a wire frame and taking off the pre-existing fabric – the lamp shades you will find in a thrift store will be a more common kind of shade but the following sewing/ fabric assembling treatment will make it look much more enchanting and wild!

fabric selection: having great fabrics is the key to a great lantern! i had a lot of amazing fabrics and trims to choose from. i choose to mix sheer, vinyl, cotton, and decorative trims. you can find these trims and fabrics from any fabric district or thrift store, but the fancier more elaborate trims we got from India.

i suggest going to a large fabric wholesaler and digging through their bins of scraps. if you happen to be in los angeles, there is only ONE place to find trims: shana-tex!!! they have sooooooo many trims stacked in high piles which you have to dig through…but so worth it because you can get huge spools of lace, sequins, and bright colored trims for pennies.

if you aren’t in los angeles, look up your neighborhood fabric wholesaler or thrift store for great rare finds. i have used thrift store table clothes, eyelet linens, etc.

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sewing/ aesthetic: i just pick out the scraps of fabric and trims that i like and begin placing them on the lantern. i prefer to start in the middle at the widest part and work out from there.

fold the fabric over a part of the wire form and do a whip stitch to hold fabric to frame and itself. from the FIRST piece of fabric, i placed another piece of trim or fabric. to keep it in place I used the straight pins and then sewed the piece of fabric. repeat this process and soon it grows into a solid lantern.

sometimes i worked in different areas of the lan-tern, but always made sure that the composition felt right and was well balanced. the look i was going for was a loose, organic assemblage of fabrics and trims….so, i just mixed sewing and tying ends in knots. the pictures tell this story. you will see sewn edges and knotted pieces. i even left holes in places to maintain the “loose” aesthetic :)

electrical hook-up: this is the easy part! i just bought a cord socket combo from home depot and threaded it through a hole (part of wire frame) and screwed in a light bulb.

so beautiful and creative!

wednes-diy

my boss has a sweater with patches on the elbows and i always thought it was the cutest thing.  then i saw this photo a couple of weeks ago and a light bulb went on.  this is an easy project!

what you need:

a sweatshirt or sweater that you don’t mind experimenting with…

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fabric, needle & thread, scissors, safety pins, and something about the size that you want the patches to be.  our visual display team let me use this scrap of pretty fabric, and i happened to have this free people sticker at my desk that was just the right size for the patches!

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first i used a sharpie to trace around the edges of the sticker on the fabric, and then cut out the patches being careful to cut right inside the marker line.

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next i pinned the patches onto the elbows of the sweater and tried it on to make sure they were placed where i wanted them to be.  keep the safety pins in as you start sewing so the patches don’t move.

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i sewed them on by hand yesterday at work and it only took about an hour –  i think sewing while listening to music has got to be one of the most relaxing things ever :)

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and voila… cute elbow patches that breathe new life into a plain old sweater!