Free People Through the Decades: The 1970s

The 1970s has always been a decade that fascinates me – it was such an interesting time of change. So many life-altering events took place in the late sixties, that the 70s seemed like a period when people were a little “dazed and confused”, turning to new types of music, film, or travel as a form of escapism. Many writers and musicians traveled to Morocco, where we shot this decade of our holiday catalog – seeking a change of scenery and inspiration. Others turned up in droves at Studio 54, to enjoy the disco music craze and dance the night away. Fashion was all about personal expression – from sequins and flowing dresses to floppy hats and bell-bottoms to the menswear look made famous by Annie Hall.

Pictured, clockwise from top left:
Led Zeppelin, one of the biggest bands of the 1970s
Diane Keaton as Annie Hall
Musician and 70s fashion icon Carly Simon
Mick Jagger and his first wife Bianca Jagger, who was a fashion icon in the 70s and fixture at Studio 54
Fleetwood Mac, who released one of the biggest albums of the 70s, Rumours, in 1977
A shot from our holiday catalog, by David Bellemere
Almost Famous captures the music scene in the 70s based on Cameron Crowe’s experience touring with some of the decade’s biggest bands, including the Allman Brothers, Lynard Skynard and Led Zeppelin.
Iconic photo of Talitha Getty in Morocco by Patrick Lichfield.

Stay tuned for some amazing behind the scenes photos, and check out the full holiday catalog.

morocco in the sixties

during the 1950s and 1960s, morocco was a refuge for writers and musicians from abroad, including the rolling stones, jack kerouac and william s. burroughs, who wrote the legendary naked lunch while staying at a hotel in tangier.  morocco was to the rolling stones what india was to the beatles – they traveled there in the late 1960s in search of musical inspiration and found that and much more.  the fusion of berber, african and arabic music had a huge influence on the rolling stones’ sound but they were also enthralled by the atmosphere of the country – especially the somewhat seedy city of tangier – home at the time to spies, smugglers, expatriate aristocrats and writers-in-exile.  they arrived in the british mod style and left in billowing shirts, weighed down by bracelets, necklaces and various trinkets.  about his experiences in morocco, keith richards said “we enjoyed being transported. you could be sinbad the sailor, one thousand and one nights. we loved it.”


the stones were part of a large crowd of swinging londoners who regularly visited morocco in the 60s.  one of the most iconic photos representing morocco and the bohemian culture of the 1960s is of talitha getty, wife of paul getty, shot by patrick lichfield on the roof of their home in marrakech.   our team was inspired to recreate this photo when shooting our catalog in morocco- here is our version!

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