diy sequined canvas

We first posted photos of the sequined canvases when our NYC store opened. Now they are part of all of the FP stores’ spring display. A reader commented asking how to make these, and one of our talented display girls had some great advice I wanted to share with everyone.
For our proto, our designer actually hand sewed each sequin on by hand, and then left a space for the screen printed flower applique. She does not recommend doing that yourself! Luren suggests going to a fabric store and buying a small amount of sequined fabric, maybe the stretchy variety. This could be a little expensive, so another great alternative would be to find some sequined wonder of a dress at a thrift store for a couple of dollars. That way you would be recycling material and not spending much $$. The fabric can them be fixed onto a frame of canvas stretchers and decorated as you like.
Hope that helps! If you end up making the project, you should send me the photos and I’ll post them on the blog! Just leave your email address in a comment and I will get in touch. Happy crafting!

learning to love you more

Learning to Love You More is a project by artists Miranda July and Harrell Fletcher. I had heard of the project before, but never really knew what it was about until this weekend. Miranda and Harrell have created this list of assignments intended to guide people toward their own experiences. In the book version of the collections, they talked about how, as artists, your life is all about creating. These artists realized that it was precisely in the moments of letting those thoughts of creation go, that they truly had these meaningful experiences.
The other thing I like about this project, is that so many of the assignments relate to childhood. We wouldn’t need these kinds of assignments as children, because we thought of this kind of stuff all the time and were just free to do it. As adults I think we forget that we have that freedom. So here are a few of my favorite assignments. Check out the website and the book, and do some of the assignments on your own.
10. Make a flier of your day.
15. Hang a windchime on a tree in a parking lot.
27. Take a picture of the sun.
33. Braid someone’s hair.
39. Take a picture of your parents kissing.

cardboard carpets

wendyplomp.jpgBloesem. Designer Wendy Plomp titled them “message in a box”. Here is a description from Louise Schouwenberg of Domus magazine.
Cardboard is probably the cheapest industrial packaging material available on the market. Any image that is printed onto this typically throwaway material can turn into a streetwise design object; something that can have a glorious second life if left to the street where it can be spontaneously employed in new applications.
For instance, it could be reborn as a disposable carpet that could instantly provide you with a clean space wherever you are, almost like a home.
To prolong the lifespan and usefulness of boxes, informative messages or ornate arabesque patterns reminiscent of precious carpets could be printed on the inside surfaces. An example could be the food parcels dropped in disaster areas; this unexploited space could be used to provide valuable information which, especially in those conditions, might be enormously helpful.