Good News to Make You Feel Good, Week of 11/6/17

Your healthy dose of feel-good current events in pop culture, fashion, travel, science, and everything in between…

And with a soft sigh, the latest round of carefree weekly updates has arrived, showcasing 10 topical reports cherry-picked to deliver an opportuuunity to chill out and deeply breathe in that soon-to-be-Saturday scent of easy times that lie so very directly ahead.

Take the chance to unapologetically recline, perhaps in a marshmallow-puffy robe, and lounge with some harmless (yet fascinating) stories selected to give you some clickable, likeable current events that are finally worth sharing with your favorites.

Peruse, ponder, audibly “awww,” lol a little, and enjoy the good news you might have missed:

Melted-heart tears are being shed across the globe over this British makeup artist’s social media post

“I want people to see that even the things which seem banal or meaningless in our daily life can become extraordinary,” says Denis Cherim of his clever framing of structures, shadows, and light beams that juxtapose into surreal, seemingly Photoshopped images. According to the photographer, “the coincidences are around us, but we need to be willing to see them.”

Now that Morrissey, who the BBC deemed “one of the most influential figures in the history of British pop,” is slowly releasing tracks for the upcoming album Low in High School, perhaps it’s time to take another spin through his earlier work with The Smiths. Hits mastered during the iconic band’s five-year run, declared the“most influential act ever” in a poll taken for New Musical Express, are still very much alive in the hearts of devoted fans and New Wave dance parties across the globe. Here, NME shares a helpful beginner’s guide to spark another generation of devotees. 

Strolling confidently down a dirt road in Canada, this plucky skunk could nottttt be bothered when a cougar emerged from the surrounding brush. Captured in a stream of front-seat footage, watch as the aromatic darling responds in a No Fear moment of valor.

Neon has taken a turn — there’s a whole new generation that it feels new to,” declares Lisa Schulte, an LA-based neon bender that fashion designers like Stella McCartney have called upon for her glowing sculptures. Here, a snapshot of how the medium has transformed from the go-to decor of dive bars and delis to elaborate, abstract illustrations sought after by art galleries and ardent collectors. 

It may, at first, appear commonplace. But no matter how many use it as an edge-eliciting tool for outfit-of-the-day selfies, the buttery soft biker jacket will forever remain a symbol of iconic cool when zipped over a pure heart. Here’s a reminder that the really good things you love with conviction can get even better with age. 

For anyone that’s recently streamed Netflix’s new documentary on the life, work, and inherent wisdom of writer Joan Didion and vowed to read every work she’s ever penned, here’s a list of tips on how to live more like a legend. Whether becoming a style icon (recently scouted for Phoebe Philo’s groundbreaking campaign) to being a captivating host, Didion’s honest attitude has been aspirational for decades. When speaking of her late husband and the secret to their 40-year marriage, she notes, “I did not always think he was right nor did he always think I was right, but we were each the person the other trusted.”

People do what they are rewarded to do. Praise and positive affirmation are contagious,” says Tim Cole, founder of The Compass Alliance, who’s made a career out of boosting morale in the workplace. In an explanation of why criticism can be a first instinct for some (and how to change that), industry insiders weigh in on how to master the art of constructive feedback for a better day, every day.

Even the most enthusiastic owners can find themselves mystified by the appeal of pets. “There is evidence that interacting with pets does reduce people’s stress, provided the pet is behaving properly,” notes anthrozoologist John Bradshaw, who’s studied human interactions with animals for decades. Though Bradshaw notes that ownership duties impart their own stressors, something called the “trustworthiness effect” has puzzled and fascinated him in studies from several countries. “People with animals, or as simply described as having a friendly dog with them, instantly become more trustworthy in the eyes of the person who’s encountering that person or having that person described to them. I think it actually explains quite a lot — people are believed when they tell nice stories about animals.” 

“I realized that it could look quite beautiful, and also that it looked a little bit odd as well,” says Jacqui Kelly, who used her recent struggles with agoraphobia as inspiration for a new form of photography. After piquing the interest of thousands with her Instagram feed featuring screenshots of Google Streetview images, the company granted Kelly permission to sell her prints, with their proceeds donated to the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation. 

 

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